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  • Adelaide Fuller

Beyond Black History Month

Updated: Jun 26


Today is the last day of the "shortest, coldest month of the year." So what does that mean for your self-education and work around Black history? Black culture? Black accomplishment? Black joy? To be blunt - it shouldn't affect your progress at all. ​ Black History Month was established by Carter G. Woodson. Woodson, born in 1875 and the son of former slaves, was himself a former coal miner and educator. Woodson was the second Black man to earn a doctorate degree at Harvard. He later founded what is known today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Woodson established what today has become known as Black History Month in 1926 after recognizing a lack of information on the accomplishments of Black people in American history. February was chosen because it is the month oof the birthdays of abolitionist author Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln. ​ We at AREA recognize the importance of this month for education. We also recognize that the vast history of Black suffering, joy, contribution and accomplishment cannot be condensed into a single month. And so as we move into March (Women's History Month!), we challenge you (and ourselves) to continue examining your own biases, practicing anti-racism through action, continuing your self-education and sharing what you've learned with others. ​ Rachel Cargle is here to guide you as you go. In her free 30-day course #DoTheWork, Cargle will challenge you, make you uncomfortable, push you to dig deeper as you move along your anti-racist path. In her words: ​ ~ This course is designed to be an eye-opener and a call to action for those who seek to be allies to Black women. (Hint hint: Women's History Month!) To #DoTheWork one must be intentional in breaking down the systems that continue to oppress and disenfranchise the Black community with Black women being the most effected. Going through these daily prompts you will be called to think critically and act tangibly in solidarity. Participating in this will be your first small step in working towards dissolving these systems, institutions, and ideologies that continue to negatively affect Black women and their communities yet benefit white people in this country.Be aware that finishing this 30 day course will not result in a certificate of 'official allyship'. Until white supremacy is completely dismantled there will be continued work to do. This is just the start.I hope that through my course your heart and mind will unlearn, expand, grapple, dissect, engage, and build a critical awareness that will change the way you move through the world as an ally. ~ While the course is designed to be completed in 30 days, it is available to you whenever you have time. Something is better than nothing at all (and lots is better than something), so do what you can. Get started by clicking the button below. ​ psst! Rachel Cargle has put in the emotional work to create this course for us. Let's pay her for it, whether it's through a one-time or recurring payment.


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